Bauer earns 2018 NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

May 17, 2018

Lisa BauerDoctoral student Lisa Bauer was awarded the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship. Bauer was one of 2,000 fellowship awardees for 2018 selected from more than 12,000 applicants nationwide.

The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP), launched in 1952, recruits high-potential, early-career scientists and engineers and supports their graduate research training in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields.

“To support U.S. leadership and innovation in science and engineering, we must recognize and nurture talent from all of our nation’s communities,” said Jim Lewis, NSF acting assistant director for Education and Human Resources. “I am pleased that again this year, the competition has selected talented students from all economic backgrounds and all demographic categories.”

Bauer’s work primarily focuses on natural language generation models for question answering and dialogue, with an emphasis on deeper reasoning and knowledge-based inference. She is also very interested in equal access to education and tutored incarcerated women at the Maryland Penitentiary. Bauer is a member of the Natural Language Processing and Machine Learning (NLP-ML) research group, advised by assistant professor Mohit Bansal.

Amert, Nemitz inducted into Frank Porter Graham Honor Society

May 16, 2018
Catherine Nemitz
Catherine Nemitz
Tanya Amert
Tanya Amert

Doctoral students Tanya Amert and Catherine Nemitz were selected for induction into the Frank Porter Graham Graduate and Professional Student Honor Society for 2018. Amert and Nemitz were two of 21 inductees in 2018.

The Frank Porter Graham Graduate and Professional Student Honor Society was founded in 1993 to recognize “outstanding service provided to the University and community” by graduate and professional students at UNC-Chapel Hill. The society also recognizes faculty, staff, and friends of the university who have made “outstanding contributions to the development of graduate and professional education” at UNC.

Amert and Nemitz served as officers for the Computer Science Student Association during the 2017-2018 academic year. In their roles, they organized social and professional development events for their fellow computer science graduate students and represented the graduate student body at faculty meetings and department events. Amert and Nemitz also served as social coordinator and president, respectively, of the Graduate Women in Computer Science Club at UNC.

Amert and Nemitz are both members of the Real-Time Systems research group and were co-authors on a publication that earned Best Student Paper at the International Conference on Real-Time Networks and Systems (RTNS) 2017.

Kuntz earns Thomas S. Kenan III Graduate Fellowship

May 15, 2018

Alan KuntzComputer science doctoral student Alan Kuntz was named to the first cohort of Thomas S. Kenan III Graduate Fellows.

The Thomas S. Kenan III Graduate Fellowship will award Kuntz a $5,000 addition to his regular stipend for the 2018-2019 academic year, as well as a $2,500 summer stipend in either 2018 or 2019. In exchange for this support, Kuntz will serve as an ambassador for UNC-Chapel Hill, aiding the university’s efforts to recruit future outstanding students to its graduate programs.

Kuntz is one of 10 recipients in the College of Arts and Sciences for the 2018-2019 academic year. Those 10 awardees were joined by 47 additional awardees of three other new graduate fellowships.

Throughout the 2017-2018 academic year, Kuntz served as an officer for the Computer Science Student Association, which is composed of all computer science graduate students at UNC.

Computer science department provides an ‘empowering’ day for visually impaired students

May 7, 2018

Carolina students invited K-12 students with visual impairments to campus to experience a variety of educational games and tools created just for them.

By Will Rimer, University Communications, Thursday, May 3rd, 2018

Nobody, Carolina first-year Graham Trogdon said, should be excluded from a college campus just because of a disability.

That was the message he wanted to send to the nearly 150 blind and visually impaired children who visited the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on May 2 for the 14thannual Maze Day.

Started in 2005 by computer science professor Gary Bishop and Carolina students in his enabling technology class, Maze Day invites K-12 students to demo a variety of educational games and tools that Bishop’s class created just for them.

“Having a day just for you, you can feel like you’re just as involved as everybody else,” said Trogdon, a computer science and linguistics major. “It’s pretty empowering.”

Students, along with their parents and teachers, came from across the state to participate in Maze Day. About half of the attendees came from the Governor Morehead School for the Blind in Raleigh.

Wali Salahuddin, a teaching assistant at the school, said Maze Day is his students’ favorite day of the year.

“As soon as the kids come back to school in September, all we hear about is Maze Day,” he said.

The other attendees came from various elementary, middle and high schools where they often are the only visually impaired students at their schools — sometimes the only ones in their district.

At Apex High School, Mikayla Gebhart is the only blind student. For her, Maze Day is an opportunity to have fun and relax by being around people who have considered her needs.

“It just feels really good not having to wonder what’s going to happen or how I’m going to access something,” said Gebhart, who will attend the Colorado Center for the Blind next year before enrolling at Wake Technical Community College. “It’s nice being with people who get it.”

Being with people who could relate to what he was going through provided great outlets for Trogdon when he came to Maze Day himself as an elementary school student.

“Having all of these programs geared toward visually impaired students filled me with awe at the time,” Trogdon said about his visits in elementary school. “It helps you connect those experiences you have that might be isolating. It helps you better understand them from other people’s perspective who have gone through them.”

Gebhart said she appreciated the opportunity to provide feedback to the Carolina students on their games, helping the students craft their demos to fit the needs of the people who will use them.

The feedback from the visually impaired students, Bishop said, provides helpful research knowledge to the faculty members and students, providing a practical learning experience for the students.

“We’re not just turning it in,” he said. “There’s a goal.”

Maze Day had it all — fun and inclusion for the visually impaired children, practical projects for Carolina students and valuable research insights.

“It’s like a triple win,” Bishop said.

UNC Science Expo says you don’t need a lab coat or a STEM degree to be a scientist

April 18, 2018

The UNC Science Expo packed Cameron Street as hundreds of future scientists and eager local residents gathered around white tents to learn about scientific innovation at UNC.

The Expo is a part of the North Carolina Science Festival, a month-long celebration of sciences across the state last weekend. The annual event provides research labs on campus an opportunity to present their research, while giving the public the opportunity to learn about the research being conducted in their own backyard.

“The UNC Science Expo is like field day, but for science nerds. As a proud, self-proclaimed nerd myself, I think it’s a wonderful celebration of science and I wish there were more throughout the year,” said sophomore information science major Libby Soucaze. “There are a bunch of different booths to visit, a variety of stage performances, interactive activities, and live demonstrations.”

The UNC Science Expo is organized by the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center and is a signature event of the statewide North Carolina Science Festival. The Town of Chapel Hill also brings in sustainability-minded organizations from around the community to participate in the event.

The Expo is a place where the public can engage in educational science demonstrations and learn about what scientific research is taking place at UNC. Every year the event attracts over 10,000 visitors, UNC Expo Coordinator Ross Ramsey said.

“For Morehead, the goal of the event is to show the community that science can be fun and inclusive. We’re trying to inspire the next generation of scientists and science enthusiasts,” Ramsey said. “We believe that, regardless of your background, science can provide an outlet for you to discover things about your world. We had a wonderful diversity of groups represented at the Expo, and that is something we hope to continue to improve upon.”

Researchers and scientists from all different areas on campus came together to showcase science, technology, engineering and math. The computer science department let visitors try their hand at virtual reality and robotics demonstrations.

The Piedmont Wildlife Center brought some of their live animals to the event. With the purpose of inciting interest in STEM among younger people, the Expo provided a unique opportunity for elementary and middle school-aged students to get a taste of what a college campus is like.

“I wandered around and looked at the different tents and interactive stations that lined East Cameron Ave. There was so much to look at,” Soucaze said. “As a former Science Olympiad competitor and coach, it brightened my day to see so much enthusiasm and energy for STEM concentrated on one small street. I finished my visit with a cherry snow cone and a seat in the audience for a lovely performance by the Tar Heel Voices.”

Saturday’s Expo promoted science education for everyone, while allowing them to see that science is fun and exciting. Events like the UNC Science Expo bring a diverse group of people together so they can celebrate science and understand just how much science impacts our lives, said senior biology major Lexie Edwards.

“For those of us who are stuck in our labs all day, it can be easy to forget how our work impacts folks in our communities and around the world. I think bringing your research to the public and sharing it with families can really help put things into perspective” Ramsey said.

@mpboney

university@dailytarheel.com

Maimone awarded IEEE Virtual Reality Best Dissertation Award

March 30, 2018

Andrew Maimone is recognized with the IEEE VR Best Dissertation Award. Photo courtesy of Amela Sadagic, NPS.

Alumnus Andrew S. Maimone (Ph.D. 2015, M.S. 2012) was selected as one of two winners of the 2018 IEEE Virtual Reality Best Dissertation Award. Maimone was recognized at the 25th IEEE Conference on Virtual Reality and 3D User Interfaces (IEEE VR) in Reutlingen, Germany.

Every year, the IEEE Visualization and Graphics Technical Committee and the IEEE VR Steering Committee selects the Best Dissertation Award winner in the broad field of Virtual and Augmented Reality. Any dissertation that was successfully defended during the two-calendar-year period prior to the award deadline is eligible for consideration. The recipient receives a cash prize of $500 along with complimentary registration to the IEEE Virtual Reality Conference, where they are invited to make a short presentation.

Maimone’s dissertation, titled “Computational See-Through Near-Eye Displays”, was successfully defended in April 2015. The full text is available on the department website. The dissertation was advised by Federico Gil Distinguished Professor Henry Fuchs.

Maimone now works as a research scientist for Facebook at Oculus Research.

Women and minorities in tech are making their voices heard

March 29, 2018

Sitting in a room with fellow team members and higher-up employees, someone suggests a solution for a work problem. No one in the room acknowledges they said anything. A few moments later, someone beside them says the same thing and receives appreciation for the good idea.

For many women and minority computer scientists, including Charles Campbell, UNC alum and co-founder of the (now-closed) online shopping mall Socialvest, experiences like this cause him to question if his ideas are not being heard because he is not white, like the majority of people in the computer science industry and academia.

Campbell wondered if no one listened to him in this situation because he is Black.

Taking time to shed light on these experiences of women and minorities in technology, the UNC Computer Science Diversity Panel showcased the difficulties these groups can face while also celebrating their accomplishments Wednesday night.

The panel featured Campbell; Tanya Amert, a third-year Ph.D. candidate and former Microsoft software development engineer; Diane Pozefsky, director of Undergraduate Studies and computer science professor; and computer science students Sydney Mantell and Armando Jimenez.

In his own experience, Campbell could not tell if no one acknowledged him because of race or because he was one of the newer members of the team.

“It was almost like a twilight zone,” Campbell said.

Amert has also dealt with similar issues in meetings as a woman, but now makes her voice heard by raising her hand.

“I found it very successful — which fits with my personality, fortunately — to channel Hermione Granger and in the middle of a loud meeting, if they’re completely not listening, I’m sitting there like this in a meeting full of guys,” Amert said, with her arm raised. “And eventually, they’re going to be like, ‘Why is she raising her hand?’ They’re all going to be silent and then I can talk.”

The panel also discussed the issue of assertive women in the workplace and how they are often viewed negatively. Pozefsky said in dealing with this, women should pick their fights and focus on building strong relationships.

“I’ve always made a real effort to have personal relationships with people and to get to know them as people and that helps a lot,” Pozefsky said. “It’s really hard to refer to somebody with a very derogatory term if you’ve been to their house for dinner.”

In addressing the low number of women and minorities in computer science, Amert stressed the importance of becoming a learning assistant in introductory computer science courses.

“When I was an undergrad, I think almost all of my professors were male,” Amert said. “I think it’s really powerful seeing somebody who looks like you in the classroom. My biggest recommendation would be to get involved as an undergrad (learning assistant). Put yourself in a position in a classroom where other students who are coming into the program see you and maybe they’ll see themselves, and that will give them that motivation: ‘Hey, they could do it, I bet I could do it too.’”

Although many UNC students see learning and teaching assistants that look like them, the path in being a computer science major has not always been easy for Jimenez, who’s a sophomore.

“It is challenging, but then there’s also that aspect of, ‘If I get past this, I know I can succeed in this course,’” Jimenez said. “I think the going does get tough sometimes. I think it’s really rewarding at the end.”

Mantell, also a sophomore, said the community computer science students build in classes is a guiding factor for her success.

“I would not be as successful at all if it wasn’t for Armando and some other comp TAs I’m friends with and other people in the class,” Mantell said. “It’s kind of crazy because COMP 410, which we’re in right now, has 300 people in it, but it feels like I know everyone. I never feel afraid to ask questions because they’re my friends and they won’t judge me.”

university@dailytarheel.com

15 CS majors and 5 CS minors among 190 UNC students inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

March 23, 2018

For immediate use

 

190 at UNC-Chapel Hill inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

 

Phi Beta Kappa is the nation’s oldest college honorary society

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— March 22, 2018) – Phi Beta Kappa inducted 190 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students as new members. The recent induction ceremony featured a keynote address by William L. Roper, M.D., MPH, dean of the UNC School of Medicine. New members received certificates and Phi Beta Kappa keys, the organization’s symbol.

 

Phi Beta Kappa membership is open to undergraduates in the college and professional degree programs who meet stringent eligibility requirements.

 

A student who has completed 75 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a GPA of 3.85 or better (on a 4-point scale) is eligible for membership. Also eligible is any student who has completed 105 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a 3.75 GPA. Grades earned at other universities are not considered. Less than 1 percent of all college students qualify.

 

Past and present Phi Beta Kappa members from across the country have included 17 American presidents, 40 U.S. Supreme Court Justices, more than 130 Nobel Laureates, and numerous artistic, intellectual and political leaders.

 

Phi Beta Kappa has 286 chapters nationwide. UNC-Chapel Hill’s chapter, Alpha of North Carolina, was founded in 1904 and is the oldest of seven chapters in the state. Each year, Phi Beta Kappa chapters and alumni associations across the country raise and distribute more than $1 million in awards, scholarships and prizes benefiting high schools and college students.

 

Phi Beta Kappa officers at UNC-Chapel Hill for 2017-2018 are students Rohanit Singh, president; Elaine Kearney, vice president; and Diana Lopez, recording secretary. James L. Leloudis, history professor, Peter T. Grauer associate dean for Honors Carolina and director of the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence, is chapter executive secretary and faculty advisor.

 

Listed below are 187 inductees, 127 of whom are from North Carolina. The names appear below in alphabetical order by North Carolina county, then by state and country. All study in the College of Arts and Sciences except where otherwise noted. Three students chose not to be listed.

 

 

Alamance County

  • Mary Margaret Evans, a senior with economics and political science majors, daughter of David Evans and Mary Evans of Burlington.
  • Jacob Benjamin Pascual, a junior with psychology and chemistry majors and a music minor, son of Roberto Pascual and Marissa Pascual of Graham.

 

Brunswick County

  • Meg Keeter Fletcher, a senior with linguistics and Hispanic linguistics majors and a Russian language and culture minor, daughter of Lyn Fletcher and Jimmy Fletcher of Shallotte.

 

Buncombe County

  • Duncan Glover Britton, a junior with a computer science major, son of Eugene Britton IV and Dr. Susan Glover of Asheville.
  • Grace Harper Buie, a senior with environmental studies and economics majors, daughter of Billie Buie and Stephen Buie of Asheville.
  • Sarah Elizabeth Gilmour, a senior with religious studies and political science majors, daughter of Monroe Gilmour and Fern Martin of Black Mountain.
  • Emily Peyton Imes, a senior with chemistry and Hispanic literature and cultures majors, daughter of Anne Imes and Jeffrey Imes of Asheville.

 

Burke County

  • Jordan Kathryn Jenkins, a junior with history and political science majors, daughter of Penny Jenkins of Morganton and Ernest Jenkins III of Kings Mountain.

 

Cabarrus County

  • Emily Susan Hollis, a senior with a biology major and medical anthropology and chemistry minors, of Huntersville.
  • Quade Robinson, a senior with Japanese and interdisciplinary studies majors and a Chinese minor, son of Ann Robinson and William Robinson of Midland.
  • Anna Catherine Silver, a junior with biology and chemistry majors and a Spanish for the medical professions minor, daughter of Sherry Silver and Dr. Robert Silver of Concord.
  • Rachel Anne Silver, a junior with psychology and exercise and sport science majors, daughter of Sherry Silver and Dr. Robert Silver of Concord.

 

Carteret County

  • Trevor Thompson Brownlow, a senior with a communication studies major, son of Joy Brownlow and Roy Brownlow of Emerald Isle.
  • Jordan Lynn Stinnett, a senior with English and communication studies majors and a medieval and early modern studies minor, daughter of Jennifer Stinnett and Richard Stinnett of Atlantic.

 

Catawba County

  • Sandy Ellen Alkoutami, a senior with public policy and economics majors and an Islamic and Middle Eastern studies minor, daughter of Ghassn Alkoutami and Rana Alkoutami of Hickory.
  • Danielle Christine Callahan, a senior with history and global studies majors, daughter of Gary Callahan and Janelle Callahan of Newton.
  • Luke Alexander Kessel, a junior with history and peace, war and defense majors and a social and economic justice minor, son of Shelia Kessel and Dr. John Kessel of Hickory.
  • Lukas Pisel, a senior with public policy and economics majors, son of Dr. Gregory Pisel and Angela Pisel of Hickory.

 

Chatham County

  • Kenya Iman Lee, a senior with a public policy major and education and African, African American and diaspora studies minors, daughter of Hoyte Lee and Belissa Lee of Moncure.
  • Samuel Lawrence Mulkern Raines, a junior with biology and chemistry majors, of Chapel Hill.

 

Cumberland County

  • Zachary Boyd, a senior with a peace, war and defense major, son of Carolyn Boyd of Fayetteville.

 

Davidson County

  • Caroline Elizabeth Wooten, a senior with an art history major and anthropology and African studies minors, daughter of David Wooten and Jennifer Wooten of Lexington.

 

Durham County

  • Hope Louise Allen, a senior with an economics major and a statistics and analytics minor, daughter of Julie Allen and Sid Allen Jr. of Durham.
  • Ingrid Grace Kottke, a senior with art history and religious studies majors and a French minor, of Durham.
  • Ryan D. Rowe, a senior with Slavic languages and cultures and music majors, son of Robert Rowe and Brandi Rowe of Durham.
  • Kevin Michael Tillman, a junior with music and German majors, son of Shirley Tillman and Andrew Tillman Jr. of Jacksonville.

 

Forsyth County

  • Ryan Austin Armstrong, a junior with physics and computer science majors, son of Douglas Armstrong and Laura Armstrong of Winston-Salem.
  • Courtney Elizabeth Cash, a senior with biology and music majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Chris Cash and Pam Cash of Winston-Salem.
  • Leah Gray Hinshaw, a junior with Latin and linguistics majors and a composition, rhetoric and digital literacy minor, daughter of Margaret Hinshaw and Billy Hinshaw Jr. of Clemmons.
  • Katia Maria Dmitrievna Lezine, a junior with an environmental science major and marine science and geography minors, daughter of Marcella Lezine of Winston-Salem and Dmitrii Lezine of Boulder, Colo.
  • Caroline Carswell Ririe, a senior with a business administration major and a music minor, daughter of Dr. Douglas Ririe and Kirsten Ririe of Winston-Salem.
  • Sophie Rupp, a senior with history and Jewish studies majors, daughter of Susan Rupp and Randall Rupp of Winston-Salem.
  • Hudson Duval Spangler, a junior with biology and computer science majors and a chemistry minor, son of Gina Spangler and Vic Spangler of Winston-Salem.
  • Cory Nicole Spencer, a junior with neuroscience and global studies majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Patricia Spencer and Kerr Spencer of Winston-Salem.

 

Gaston County

  • Sara Rachel Gray, a senior with a global studies major and a Spanish minor, daughter of Charles Gray and Elizabeth Gray of Belmont.

 

Granville County

  • Lawrence Alsthon Guira Bacudio, a senior with a nutrition major and a chemistry minor, of Creedmoor.

 

Guilford County

  • Sabrina Cheung, a senior with a media and journalism major and English and computer science minors, daughter of Win Pang and Charlie Cheung of Greensboro.
  • Jack Henry Crouse, a junior with English and computer science majors and a Hispanic studies minor, of Greensboro.
  • Natalie Michelle Johnson, a senior with global studies and political science majors and an Arabic minor, daughter of Suzanne Johnson and Mitchell Johnson of Greensboro.
  • Catherine Marie Machanic, a junior with public policy and economics majors and a French minor, daughter of Joan Machanic and David Machanic of Greensboro.
  • Kristen Eilis McCain, a junior with business administration and global studies majors and a Korean minor, daughter of Patrick McCain and Elizabeth McCain of Greensboro.
  • Rachel Park, a senior with philosophy and political science majors, daughter of Steve Park and Rebecca Park of Greensboro.
  • Jane Bradford Pearce, a junior with a biology major and chemistry and art history minors, daughter of Jackie Pearce and Ed Pearce of Greensboro.
  • Mary Madison Smith, a senior with psychology and management and society majors and a public policy minor, of Greensboro.

 

Henderson County

  • Emily Elizabeth Hagstrom, a senior with public policy and political science majors and a women’s and gender studies minor, daughter of Kathy Purdy and Eric Hagstrom of Hendersonville.
  • Maliha Zainab Khan, a junior with health policy and management and global studies majors, daughter of Saleem Khan and Nasreen Khan of Hendersonville.

 

Iredell County

  • Sarah Anne Faulk, a senior with public policy and global studies majors and a social and economic justice minor, daughter of Dr. Kellie Faulk and Jeffrey Faulk of Statesville.
  • Kelly Lauren Hughes, a senior with an economics major and an environmental science and studies minor, daughter of Philip Hughes and Nancy Hughes of Mooresville.
  • Hannah Jaggers, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and public policy minors, daughter of Dr. Terri Jaggers and Ronald Jaggers of Mooresville.
  • Clark Alexander Williamson, a senior with an environmental health sciences major and chemistry and biology minors, son of Alice Williamson and Dr. Mark Williamson of Statesville.

 

Lenoir County

  • Tyson Hardy Creech II, a junior with an exercise and sport science major and music and neuroscience minors, son of Hardy Creech and Dana Creech of Kinston.

 

Mecklenburg County

  • Shawn Ahuja, a junior with an exercise and sport science major and a chemistry minor, son of Ann Ahuja and Dr. Jay Ahuja of Charlotte.
  • Jameson Deans Blount, a junior with a biostatistics major and mathematics and medicine, literature and culture minors, son of Jane Blount and Phil Blount of Charlotte.
  • Abigail Ann Drees, a senior with biology and global studies majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Rachel Drees and Dan Drees of Charlotte.
  • Khushnood Faraz, a junior with biology and chemistry majors and a medicine, literature and culture minor, daughter of Ahmad Faraz and Romana Gul of Charlotte.
  • Ryan Alexander Gibson, a junior with computer science and mathematics majors, son of Richard Gibson and Sharon Gibson of Charlotte.
  • Emily Catherine Jarrett, a senior with global studies and anthropology majors and a creative writing minor, daughter of Kimberly Jarrett and Dr. Steven Jarrett of Charlotte.
  • Esther Lee, a junior with environmental health sciences and classics majors and a chemistry minor, of Charlotte.
  • Frances Lee Mueller, a senior with biology and religious studies majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Sarah Hyde Mueller and Dr. Joseph Cole Mueller of Charlotte.
  • Alexander Richard Penner, a senior with an exercise and sport science major and a coaching education minor, son of Richard Penner and Kathleen Penner of Charlotte.
  • Kristin Mackenzie Reed, a junior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and a studio art minor, daughter of Charles Reed Jr. and Dana Reed of Charlotte.
  • Margaret Anna Williams, a junior with political science and peace, war and defense majors and a German minor, daughter of Thomas Williams and Judyth Williams of Matthews.

 

Montgomery County

  • Katherine Caby Styers, a senior with anthropology and Asian studies majors and a Korean minor, daughter of Phillip Styers and Janie Styers of New London.

 

Moore County

  • Hannah Ruth Carter, a senior with global studies and peace, war and defense majors and a Hispanic studies minor, of Eagle Springs.
  • Alexander Warfield Snyder, a senior with peace, war and defense and political science majors and a public policy minor, son of Anna Fakadej and Robert Snyder of Pinehurst.

 

New Hanover County

  • Peyton Michelle Coleman, a senior with history and political science majors and a medieval and early modern studies minor, daughter of Michelle Coleman and Jeffrey Coleman of Wilmington.
  • Aisling Spencer Henihan, a junior with an art history major and geography and creative writing minors, daughter of Dr. Robert Henihan and Jane Henihan of Wilmington.
  • Kristin Michelle Isbell, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and Spanish for the professions minors, daughter of Toni Isbell and Danny Isbell of Wilmington.
  • Zaid Khatib, a senior with global studies and philosophy majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, son of Adel Khatib and Carol Khatib of Raleigh.
  • Zachary Matthew Lee, a junior with German literature and culture and sociology majors and a medieval and early modern studies minor, son of Ann Newton of Wilmington and Byron Lee of Jacksonville.
  • Megan Rose Ogorchock, a junior with a chemistry major and mathematics and biology minors, daughter of Daniel Ogorchock and Patricia Ogorchock of Wilmington.

 

Orange County

  • Agustin Baler, a senior with economics and political science majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, son of Dr. Ricardo Baler and Gisel Baler of Chapel Hill.
  • Oscar Quinn Brennwald, a senior with a computer science major, son of Dr. Patrick Brennwald and Dr. Guendalina Brennwald of Chapel Hill.
  • Kevin Lee Chen, a junior with a statistics and analytics major and a computer science minor, son of Fu-lin Chen and Liling Li of Chapel Hill.
  • Christian Jaeger Cook, a junior with biology and English majors and a chemistry minor, son of Dr. Chad Cook and Amy Cook of Chapel Hill.
  • Hannah Rose Frediani, a junior with mathematics and computer science majors and a biology minor, of Carrboro.
  • William Bradley Hamilton, a junior with an environmental science major and a computer science minor, son of Brad Hamilton and Mary Hamilton of Chapel Hill.
  • Margaret Louise Hassel, a junior with women’s and gender studies and economics majors and a geography minor, daughter of Emily Ayscue Hassel and Dr. Bryan Hassel of Chapel Hill.
  • Nell Cyrene Ovitt, a senior with English and religious studies majors, daughter of Laura Williams and James Ovitt.
  • Grace Frances Porter, a senior with psychology and history majors and a French minor, daughter of Greg Porter and Margaret Mary Doherty of Chapel Hill.
  • Corey Landever Risinger, a senior with English and Hispanic literature and cultures majors, daughter of Carolyn Landever and Brad Risinger of Chapel Hill.
  • Mary Alex Staude, a senior with an English major and dramatic art and history minors, of Carrboro.
  • Victoria Gabrielle Whitley, a junior with an applied mathematics major and a women’s and gender studies minor, daughter of John Whitley Jr. and Daun Whitley of Chapel Hill.

 

Pasquotank County

  • Cameron Wesley Pharr, a junior with a chemistry major and a history minor, son of Dr. Tarkten Pharr and Dr. Maria Pharr of Elizabeth City.
  • Adrian Leia Wood, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Dr. Angela Wood and Dr. John Wood of Elizabeth City.

 

Pitt County

  • Abigail R. Needell, a senior with a psychology major and biology and medical anthropology minors, daughter of Russell Needell and Dr. Wanda Needell of Greenville.

 

Polk County

  • Morgan Robertson Pratt, a senior with a global studies major and a music minor, son of Amy Pratt and Adrian Pratt of Den Haag, Netherlands.

 

Randolph County

  • Paul Charles Smith, a senior with a dramatic art major and creative writing and geological sciences minors, son of Karen D. Smith and Matthew R. Smith of Asheboro.

 

Rowan County

  • Jackson Woodward Campbell, a junior with dramatic art and communication studies majors, son of Don Campbell and Sarah Campbell of Salisbury.
  • Daniel Keith Winecoff, a junior with biology and music majors and a chemistry minor, son of Susan Winecoff and Todd Winecoff of Salisbury.

 

Union County

  • Adrienne Solange Bonar, a senior with psychology and women’s and gender studies majors, daughter of Ursula Bonar and Dr. Adolphus Bonar of Charlotte.
  • Hannah Lee Dearstyne, a senior with a comparative literature major, daughter of Tammy Dearstyne and David Dearstyne of Matthews.
  • Benjamin Holte Sagmoe, a junior with computer science and mathematics majors and a German minor, son of Jeanette Sagmoe and Todd Sagmoe of Waxhaw.
  • Jeff Z. Yang, a senior with mathematical decision sciences and economics majors, of Waxhaw.

 

Wake County

  • Kevin L. Adington, a junior with environmental science and mathematics majors and a Chinese minor, son of David Adington and Lori Adington of Raleigh.
  • Benjamin Todd Albert, a senior with business administration and economics majors and a public policy minor, son of Lynn Albert and Mark Albert of Cary.
  • Hadley Ashford, a senior with global studies and Spanish majors, daughter of John Ashford and Laura Ashford of Raleigh.
  • Olivia Grace Bane, a senior with public policy and political science majors and a public relations minor, daughter of Warren Bane and Misty Bane of Raleigh.
  • Emmie Banks, a senior with a psychology major, daughter of Linda Banks and Darryl Banks of Wake Forest.
  • Sarah Jacqueline Bass, a senior with an economics major and a social and economic justice minor, daughter of Bonnie Bass and David Bass of Raleigh.
  • Mary Grady Burnette Bell, a senior with history and business administration majors and a media and journalism minor, daughter of Mary Grady Bell and Vic Bell of Raleigh.
  • Sarah Ann Benecky, a senior with anthropology and global studies majors, of Raleigh.
  • Ryder Kendall Best, a senior with statistics and analytics and economics majors and a business administration minor, son of Raymond Best of Garner.
  • Amy Marie Cohen, a junior with global studies and political science majors and a social and economic justice minor, daughter of Mary Cohen and Richard Cohen of Raleigh.
  • Katherine Gora Combs, a junior with biostatistics and music majors and a mathematics minor, daughter of Michele Gora and Dr. Jeffery Combs of Cary.
  • Adelaide Rosalie Cooke, a junior with biology and chemistry majors, of Cary.
  • Christiana Maria Cornea, a junior with biology and chemistry majors and a neuroscience minor, daughter of Emil Cornea and Mihaela Cornea of Cary.
  • Joshua James Dodson, a senior with a public policy major and a music minor, son of Dan Dodson and Daphne Dodson of Cary.
  • Tracy Kim Edwards, a senior with chemistry and religious studies majors and an education minor, daughter of Christine Edwards and Steve Edwards of Apex.
  • Pallavi Gulati, a senior with a business administration major and a history minor, daughter of Dipak Gulati and Dipti Gulati of Cary.
  • Sara T. Hall, a junior with political science and media and journalism majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, daughter of Thomas Hall and Karen Hall of Apex.
  • Marwan Ayman Hawari, a junior with biomedical and health sciences engineering and biology majors and a chemistry minor, son of Rana Hawari and Ayman Hawari of Cary.
  • Sanjna Iyengar, a junior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Jyothi Haravu and Nagasimha Haravu of Apex.
  • Gauri Joshi, a senior with health policy and management and biology majors, daughter of Sampada Joshi and Krishna Joshi of Morrisville.
  • Alexander Y. Z. Li, a senior with a chemistry major and a biology minor, son of Nan Jiang and Erkang Zheng of Cary.
  • Lukas Alexander Lyon, a junior with biostatistics and mathematics majors and a chemistry minor, son of Alexander Strotzer and Lorri Lyon of Apex.
  • Lucas Oliver McCallen, a senior with economics and religious studies majors and a business administration minor, of Apex.
  • Rachel Elizabeth McGrath, a senior with political science and global studies majors and a Russian language and culture minor, daughter of Thomas McGrath and Diane McGrath of Cary.
  • John Raymond Mullan, a senior with a statistics and analytics major and an environmental sciences minor, son of Brian Mullan and Katherine Mullan of Raleigh.
  • Grace Elizabeth Nipp, a junior with an environmental health sciences major and chemistry and biology minors, daughter of Laurie Nipp and Carriel Nipp of Raleigh.
  • Brennan William Proudfoot, a senior with a computer science major, son of Lilette Proudfoot and Douglas Proudfoot.
  • Sahana Raghunathan, a senior with health policy and management and chemistry majors, daughter of Ragunathan Srinivasan and Rajalakshmi Padmanabhan of Cary.
  • Ishan Jay Shah, a junior with statistics and analytics and biology majors and a computer science minor, son of Manju Shah and Jay Shah.
  • Katie Sullivan, a senior with a psychology major and neuroscience and public relations minors, daughter of Kay Atchison and Tom Sullivan of Raleigh.
  • Lydia Claire Trogdon, a junior with history and journalism and mass communication majors and a computer science minor, daughter of Mark Trogdon and Renee Trogdon of Raleigh.
  • Anna Kathryn Twiddy, a junior with English and classics majors, daughter of Kathryn Twiddy and Curtis Twiddy of Raleigh.

 

Wayne County

  • Lindsay Ann Player, a senior with a biology major and neuroscience and chemistry minors, daughter of Troy Player and Kim Player of Apex.

 

Alabama

  • Alexander William Peeples, a senior with history and political science majors and an African studies minor, of Daphne.

 

California

  • Kaitlyn Mallie, a senior with a political science major and a social and economic justice minor, daughter of Michael Mallie and Debra Mallie of Pleasanton.
  • Caroline Orleanskaia, a senior with an exercise and sport science major and a neuroscience minor, of Carlsbad.

 

Colorado

  • Jillian Kay Troftgruben, a junior with mathematical decision sciences and computer science majors and an entrepreneurship minor, daughter of Christine Forkner and Jeffery Troftgruben of Aurora.

 

Connecticut

  • Griffin Jack Bell, a senior with a biostatistics major, son of Sharon Bell of Ridgefield and Richard Bell of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
  • Ryan Silk, a senior with business administration and environmental studies majors, of Stamford.

 

Florida

  • Briana Notterpek Fletcher, a junior with chemistry and biology majors, daughter of Lucia Notterpek and Bradley Fletcher.
  • Jamie Leigh Lebhar, a junior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and a chemistry minor, of Naples.
  • Nicholas McKenzie, a junior with a health policy and management major and a chemistry minor, son of Sandy McKenzie and Lance McKenzie.
  • Carlos Antonio Perez-Heydrich, a junior with a biology major and chemistry and neuroscience minors, son of Laura Perez-Heydrich and Eduardo Perez-Heydrich of Miami.
  • Ashley Anne Privette, a junior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, of Apollo Beach.
  • Kailyn Janelle Valido, a junior with a biology major and chemistry and medical anthropology minors, daughter of Dr. Martha Toledo-Valido and Ernesto Valido of Miami.

 

Georgia

  • Amanda L. Brademeyer, a junior with a biochemistry major, daughter of Doug Brademeyer and Kim Brademeyer of Cumming.
  • Kyra Nicole DeKoning, a senior with psychology and political science majors and a global cinema minor, daughter of Michael DeKoning and Allison DeKoning of Alpharetta.
  • Ronak Pipaliya, a junior with business administration and computer science majors, son of Dhiru Pipaliya and Hansa Pipaliya of Duluth.
  • Nicholas McDaniel Teague, a junior with biology and psychology majors and a chemistry minor, son of Dr. Charles Teague and Dr. Richelle Teague of Columbus.

 

Illinois

  • Zane Daniel Kaiser, a junior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and a Spanish for the health professions minor, son of Daniel Kaiser and Kimberly Irle of Bartlett.

 

Kansas

  • Joseph Robert Nail, a senior with political science and economics majors and an entrepreneurship minor, son of Christopher Nail and Kerry Nail of Whispering Pines, N.C.

 

Louisiana

  • Nicholas Alfredo Larsen, a senior with a statistics and analytics major, of Shreveport.

 

Maryland

  • Andrea Jacqueline Barnes, a senior with a public policy major and education and Hispanic studies minors, daughter of Sandra Barnes and Travis Barnes of Fort Washington.
  • Isabel Jane Mason, a senior with an English major and chemistry and religious studies minors, of Bethesda.
  • Dhruv Sundar Shankar, a senior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and a chemistry minor, son of Kala Shankar and Sundar Shankar of Germantown.

 

Massachusetts

  • Madisyn Ann Hill, a senior with a chemistry major and biology and Hispanic studies minors, daughter of William Hill and Karen Hill of Ware.
  • Mary Kate Elizabeth Nolan, a senior with global studies and communication studies majors and an Italian minor, daughter of Terence Nolan and Elizabeth Wilson of Walpole.
  • Yina Sun, a senior with environmental science and economics majors and a statistics and analytics minor, of Shrewsbury.

 

Minnesota

  • Alex Polydoroff, a senior with anthropology and music majors, of Saint Paul.

 

Missouri

  • Lilian Randolph Heil, a junior with chemistry and physics majors and a neuroscience minor, of St. Louis.
  • Christina Victoria West, a senior with a psychology major and a history minor, daughter of Robert West and Keylah West of St. Louis.

 

Nebraska

  • Bridget Vera Mizener, a sophomore with political science and computer science majors, of Omaha.

 

New Jersey

  • Samuel John Aldous, a senior with a biochemistry major and a French minor, son of Dr. David Aldous and Suzanne Aldous of Concord, Mass.
  • Patrick Graham Archer, a senior with peace, war and defense and political science majors and an education minor, son of James Archer and Denise Archer of Randolph.
  • Angelo Ibrahim Chaia, a senior with chemistry and English majors and a biology minor, son of Antoine Chaia and Lisa Chaia of Scotch Plains.
  • Kaitlin Eileen Sanzone, a senior with a chemistry major and a biology minor, daughter of Dr. John Sanzone and Kyle Sanzone of Montville.

 

New York

  • Brittany Cooper, a junior with a biology major and Hispanic studies and chemistry minors, of New City.
  • Daniel R. Fleszar, a senior with a music major and a politics, philosophy and economics minor, son of Regina Fleszar and George Fleszar.
  • Eric Mai, a senior with an environmental health sciences major and a chemistry minor, son of Harry Mai and Karen Mai.

 

Ohio

  • Hunter Steele Baehren, a senior with political science and economics majors, son of Margaret Baehren of Toledo.
  • Madeline Leigh Watson, a junior with a biology major and Spanish for the medical professions and chemistry minors, daughter of Lori Reiber of Dayton and Mike Watson of Chicago, Ill.

 

Pennsylvania

  • Pragnya Dontu, a junior with a chemistry major and physics and neuroscience minors, daughter of Dr. Vijay Dontu and Dr. Vijaya Tummala of York.
  • Eric Markley, a junior with biomedical and health sciences engineering and applied mathematics majors and a chemistry minor, son of Catherine Markley and Dave Markley of Hummelstown.

 

Rhode Island

  • Eric Qian, a senior with mathematics and statistics and analytics majors and an economics minor, son of Zhenchao Qian and Hong Xia of Providence.

 

South Carolina

  • Travis William Barnett, a junior with computer science and business administration majors, of Mount Pleasant.
  • Grace Suzanne Breazeale, a junior with public policy and economics majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Ally Breazeale and Ben Breazeale of Irmo.

 

Tennessee

  • Kate Goldenring, a junior with computer science and economics majors, daughter of Jim Goldenring and Colleen Brophy.
  • Kelly Liu, a senior with a nutrition major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Judy Liu of Knoxville.

 

Texas

  • Tate Elizabeth Giddens, a junior with a biology major and a study of Christianity and culture minor, of Dallas.
  • Eva Marie Gonzalez Pena, a senior with business administration and global studies majors and a French minor, daughter of Carlos Gonzalez Pena and Holly Gonzalez Pena of Dallas.
  • Anna Colleen Goodnight, a senior with business administration and economics majors, of Houston.

 

Virginia

  • Rachel Medlin Evans, a senior with a music major, daughter of Annette Medlin of Staunton and Charles Evans of Myrtle Beach, S.C.
  • Franklin Richard Gergoudis, a senior with an environmental health sciences major and biology and chemistry minors, son of Dr. Richard Gergoudis and Elaine Gergoudis of Richmond.
  • Sara Elaine Hudson, a junior with biology and chemistry majors, daughter of Stan Hudson and Joanne Hudson of Burke.
  • Daniel Robert Schwartz, a junior with a music performance major and a modern Hebrew minor, son of Shari Hershkowitz Schwartz and Sid Schwartz of Vienna.

 

West Virginia

  • Lindsay Gayle Jones, a junior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Dr. Jeffrey Jones of Wilson, N.C., and Lisa Fawcett of Hurricane.

 

Brazil

  • Andre Bicalho Ceccotti, a senior with an economics major, of Belo Horizonte.

 

China

  • Jie He, a junior with biostatistics and computer science majors, of Chong Qing.
  • Zijin Lin, a senior with a chemistry major and a biology minor, of Chengdu.
  • Jiacheng Liu, a junior with information science and biology majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Shaohong Liu and Mei Cheng of Guangzhou.
  • Shuhan Xia, a senior with mathematical decision sciences and economics majors, son of Guming Xia and Chunhui Wang of Hangzhou.

 

England

  • Rebekah Claire Cockram, a senior with history and political science majors, daughter of Claire Cockram and James Cockram of Newton Abbot, Devon.

 

Italy

  • Emily Ann Venturi, a senior with political science and economics majors, daughter of Vittorio Venturi and Tracy Stannard of Trieste.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

Phi Beta Kappa contact: Jason Clemmons, (919) 843-7756, jclem@email.unc.edu

UNC Comp Sci department works to close gender gap

March 21, 2018

At UNC, women make up nearly 30 percent of the computer science major, up from 15 percent when the Department of Computer Science began addressing the gender gap about four years ago. One of the department’s most successful efforts is the outreach done by the COMP 110 team to increase gender representation among teaching assistants.

Gabi Stein, co-lead teaching assistant for COMP 110, said since joining the team, Kris Jordan, the teaching professor for the course, prioritized making COMP 110 diverse and inclusive because of the number of students that take the course.

“If we have any chance of making (female students) fall in love with CS like we did, we have to have an inclusive team that’s going to make it seem like, ‘Oh yeah, if that person can do CS and they look like me, so can I,’” Stein said. “It shouldn’t just be a bunch of white males teaching white males CS, and so we really try hard to recruit people that show the diversity of North Carolina.”

While no preference is given to women that apply to be on the COMP110 team, Stein said giving top women and minority students the confidence to apply makes selecting a more diverse group of teaching assistants possible.

Sophomore Kimia Pourali, co-president of Women in Computer Science at UNC, said the gender balance on the COMP 110 TA team encourages women to continue enrolling in the higher computing courses.

“I think it’s working because I’ve definitely come across girls who were freshmen and came to WiCS and they were in 401 by the second semester, and they said what got them to keep going into 401 was that they had a women TA or LA,” she said.

In addition to the outreach efforts by the COMP110 team, the department also started an Emerging Scholars program to offer exposure to computer science for students without prior experience. The department also partners with the Girls Who Code club at UNC, offers various labs to develop computing skills and hosts diversity panels each semester.

Kevin Jeffay, department chairperson, said the aim is to put programs in place that will attract and retain women and members of underrepresented groups. Jeffay said the department is also slowly evolving the curriculum to be more empowering and welcoming to eventually reflect the diversity of the University.

“The field is never really going to progress if it doesn’t include everyone. Women need to be fully participating,” he said. “There’s all sorts of studies that show that the more diverse the team is, the better the product that they make, the better the ideas they come up with. To have more homogeneous groups, say of all males, it’s not good for the field and its not good for the economy.”

According to Girls Who Code, technology jobs are one of the fastest growing industries in the country; however, women are being left behind with the biggest drop off in interest occurring between ages 13 to 17. Jeffay said this is why the department must increase outreach to women on campus and continue creating programs that make clear pathways from courses to industry.

“If (UNC’s) graduates are say, only 20 or 30 percent female, that means the companies also have a hard time achieving parity, at least on a gender basis,” Jeffay said. “So a lot of what we’re doing is we’re partnering with local industry to help address this problem, and it’s important to note that local industry is very much engaged in the problem, and in the solutions we’re developing here at UNC.”

Diane Pozefsky, director of undergraduate studies for the department, said she is pleased with the progress made, but stressed that diversity must be part of the system in order to truly make a difference.

“If you don’t make it part of your DNA, it’ll backslide,” Pozefsky said. “I don’t want people to think we’ve had the program, we’ve improved to a good enough point and we’re done.”

When the COMP 110 team began its outreach efforts in Fall 2015, 25 percent of the teaching assistants were women. In Fall 2017, female TAs made up 60 percent of the team – matching the gender demographics of the University.

Stein said this progress shows how effectively a proactive plan can create change, and gender representation in every course is critical.

“If you’re an intro-CS student reaching out, you should be able to reach out to someone who mirrors you in some way, and so we’re able to do that,” she said. “You should be able to do that as you continue to do that as you move through your career, and see people in power that look like you.”

@HannerMcClellan

university@dailytarheel.com

UNC CS ranked #25 (tie) among computer science graduate programs for 2019 by U.S. News & World Report

March 20, 2018

For immediate use

UNC-Chapel Hill Graduate Programs Ranked Among “Best Graduate Schools”

U.S. News & World Report ranked UNC School of Medicine first for its primary care program

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— March 20, 2018) – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill graduate programs received high rankings as part of U.S. News & World Report’s 2019 “Best Graduate Schools.” Among the rankings, the UNC School of Medicine is first for its primary care program, following a second-place ranking last year.

U.S. News ranks business, education, engineering, law, nursing and medical programs annually, while various disciplines and specialties in the sciences, social sciences, humanities and other areas, are only ranked periodically.

This year, U.S. News ranked doctoral programs in criminology and criminal justice; master’s degree programs in social work, public affairs and related specialty areas; and doctoral programs in the sciences, specifically in biological sciences, chemistry, computer science, earth sciences, mathematics, physics and statistics.

The following are the complete UNC-Chapel Hill rankings and specialty listings. A comprehensive list of all rankings and data can be found here.

School of Medicine

Overall

  • Primary Care, 1st
  • Research, tied for 23rd

Specialty area

  • Obstetrics & Gynecology, 14th

School of Nursing

Overall

  • Master’s Degree, tied for 14th
  • Doctor of Nursing Practice, tied for 13th

 

Specialty areas

  • Nursing Administration, tied for 12th
  • Nurse Practitioner: Family, tied for 12th
  • Nurse Practitioner: Psychiatric/Mental Health, Across the Lifespan, tied for 9th

School of Social Work

Overall

  • Tied for 5th

Kenan-Flagler Business School

Overall

  • 19th

Specialty areas

  • Accounting, 11th
  • Executive MBA, 16th
  • Finance, 29th
  • Management, tied for 20th
  • Marketing, tied for 15th

School of Law

Overall

  •  45th

Specialty area

  • Legal Writing, tied for 12th

School of Education

Overall

  • Tied for 30th

Specialty areas

  • Administration/Supervision, tied for 14th
  • Curriculum/Instruction, 17th
  • Secondary Education, 14th
  • Special Education, tied for 11th

Public Affairs

Overall

  • Tied for 23rd

Specialty areas

  • Environmental Policy and Management, 14th
  • Local Government Management, 3rd
  • Public Finance and Budgeting, tied for 20th
  • Public Management and Leadership, tied for 15th
  • Public Policy Analysis, tied for 32nd

 

  • Carolina has programs and specialty areas within several units based in the School of Government, the College of Arts and Sciences and the Gillings School of Global Public Health with master’s degree programs that are ranked by U.S. News as part of a public affairs category.

Sciences

  • Biology, tied for 33rd
  • Biostatistics, tied for 8th
  • Chemistry, tied for 15th
  • Analytical Chemistry, 2nd
  • Inorganic Chemistry, 10th
  • Computer Science, tied for 25th
  • Earth Sciences, tied for 54th
  • Mathematics, tied for 34th
  • Physics, tied for 47th
  • Statistics, 19th

Methodology: U.S. News first ranked graduate programs in 1987 and has done so annually since 1990. Each year it ranks professional programs in business, education, engineering, law, nursing and medicine. Those rankings are based on two types of data: expert opinion on program excellence and statistical indicators that measure the quality of a school’s faculty, research and students. Its periodic rankings of additional disciplines and specialties in the sciences, social sciences, humanities and other areas are based solely on the ratings of peer academic experts, including deans, program directors and faculty.

The data come from statistical surveys sent to administrators at more than 1,970 graduate programs and from reputation surveys sent to more than 16,500 academics and professionals in the disciplines. Surveys for the 2019 rankings were conducted during the fall of 2017 and in early 2018.

-Carolina-

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu

U.S. News & World Report contactEducation-PR@usnews.com