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Table of Contents


Areas of Support

Reviewed by bil hays 7.15.2017

Operating system support (Windows/Linux/Mac)

installation
upgrades
patching
imaging
troubleshooting

Application support (standard and additional applications)

ordering
installation
upgrades
troubleshooting

Google Suite

Drive
Gmail
Groups
Docs
Backup and Sync
Google Hangouts

Computers and related hardware maintenance (Dell/Lenovo/Apple primarily)

purchase
initial setup
troubleshooting
warranty and post-warranty repair

Backups

AFS
Windows
Linux
Macintosh

Computer security

monitoring
firewalls
intrusion prevention
antivirus control service

Email service

SMTP (mail forwarding, @cs-old.sites.unc.edu, mail lists)
Google mail administration

Web services

department web server
CGI server
class web services
custom administrative web pages

Databases

administrative systems – development and support
user systems – limited disk space and backups

Other central software services

disk service (AFS, NFS)
version control services (CVS, Subversion, Git)
software update service
software distribution (Windows, Mac)
domain controllers, WINS service (Windows)
DNS, DHCP, NIS, LDAP, time
compute and login service (Linux)
calendar service (Google calendar)
ITWorks (administrative data) service

Network

standard production network
specialized research setups
wireless

Building security

access control
video

Computer and peripheral configuration and ordering

User accounts and disk space

Software licensing

Training: one-on-one and in groups

Help web pages

Telephones

voice connections
voice mail
moves

Projector installation and maintenance

Multimedia and video recording

Videoconferencing and Recording

Room control systems (AMX)

Graphics hardware support

Printers, copiers, and scanners

Equipment moves

Office furniture – moves and ordering

Electrical, HVAC, plumbing

Inventory

Special event support

Emergency support

Interface with campus support groups: OASIS, ITS and Others


Sources of Help article

A list of the various ways you can get help in the department

Reviewed by Bil Hays 4/8/2016

This article tells about ways you can get help, including sending mail to help, the Computer Services help line, the Computer Services pager, submitting a remedy ticket via the web, the front desk, Computer Services help pages, online manual pages, the CS help web page, asking your neighbor, and after hours help.

 

Mailing help

Sending mail to “help” is how one usually goes about making a request for services or information from Computer Services.  Mail to “help” is read by a member of the Computer Services staff 9-12 and 2-5 on workdays, and we generally watch the mail pretty regularly at other times as well. Your question will be logged into the Remedy issue tracking and escalation system.  You should receive an acknowledgement message as soon as your email is processed and assigned a ticket number. See here for some info on our local system.

Computer Services help line

If you cannot readily send your request or question by email (e.g., your computer or the network is down), you can call 919-590-6172, which rings in the offices of several Computer Services staff members as well as in our electronics shop, SN128.  Note that this line is not manned all the time and it is not equipped with voice mail, but it is worth a try during working hours.

In Cases  of Emergency

For EMERGENCIES, follow this procedure.

Submitting a Remedy ticket via the web

Go to https://www.cs-old.sites.unc.edu/xhelp/cs_web_submission/ to submit a Remedy ticket via the web. See here for info on the Remedy ticket system.

Online manuals

We have the standard UNIX online manual, with some local additions.   “Man command” gives information on command, and “man man” tells about the man command itself.

CS Help web page

The Computer Services web page, at https://cs-old.sites.unc.edu/how-to/, has a variety of useful information about our local setup.

Asking your neighbor

Perhaps one of the easiest and most effective ways to obtain an answer to a question, meet a friend, and build a network of support is to ask the person at the computer next to you if he knows the answer to your question.  Many of the users in the Department are quite sophisticated in the ways of our systems, and practically everyone is ready and willing to help out.

After hours help

See here for information on how to get assistance after normal working hours.