Below is a selection of current open solicitation calls of relevance to areas of research in the Department.

 

Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Supplemental Funding

UNC Creativity Hubs Pilot Awards Due November 13th

Discovery Research PreK – 12 (DRK12) Due to OSR November 7th

NSF Advancing Informal STEM Learning Due to OSR October 30th

2017 NSF CISE (Small, Medium and Large) Smalls due to OSR November 8th

NSF Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) Due to ORD October 17th

NSF CISE Research Infrastructure (CRI) Due to OSR October 26th

NSF Computational and Data-Enabled Science and Engineering (CDS&E) Various deadlines, with several at end of October

NSF Division of Electrical, Communications and Cyber Systems (ECCS) Programs Due to OSR October 25th

DoD Medical Simulation and Information Sciences, Toward A Next-Generation Trauma Care Capability: Foundational Research for Autonomous, Unmanned, and Robotics Development of Medical Technologies (FORwARD) Award Pre-Application Submissions due to OSR November 13th

NSF Small Business Technology Transfer Program Phase I (STTR) Due to OSR November 27th

NSF Small Business Innovation Research Program Phase I (SBIR) Due to OSR November 27th

NIH Standard Programs

NSF Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation (CMMI) Programs

NSF Cyberlearning for Work at the Human-Technology Frontier Due to OSR January 2nd

NSF CISE Scalable Parallelism in the Extreme (SPX) Due to OSR January 2nd

 

Young Investigator Funding Opportunities – A regularly updated list of opportunities for young researchers maintained by UC San Diego. Please contact Dief, Megan or Shannon for assistance with any of the programs listed at this site.

 

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Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Supplemental Funding

The NSF Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) invites grantees with active CISE awards to submit requests for Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Supplemental funding. A student must be a US citizen or permanent resident of the US. The duration for new requests is typically one year. The proposed start date for a supplement must be after the conclusion of all existing REU supplements on the corresponding active CISE award. Priority will be given to requests submitted before March 30, 2018; the potential for funding requests after this date will be limited. If requests for REU supplemental support exceed funds available in CISE, requests will be considered in the order received. REU supplemental funds can be used at any time during the year.

REU stipend support helps retain talented students, while providing meaningful research experiences and encouraging research-based careers. The participation of students from groups underrepresented in computing — underrepresented minorities, women, and persons with disabilities — is strongly encouraged. To this end, principal investigators (PIs) submitting REU supplemental funding requests are directed to the recent CISE Dear Colleague Letter encouraging meaningful actions in support of broadening participation in computing [see Pursuing Meaningful Actions in Support of Broadening Participation in Computing (BPC); NSF 17-110]. In addition, CISE encourages REU supplements that specifically afford US veterans an opportunity to engage in meaningful research experiences.

Investigators are encouraged to refer to the REU program solicitation (NSF 13-542) for detailed information concerning submission requirements. As described above and in that solicitation, REU supplemental proposals should include:

  • A description of the research to be performed by the student, and how the student will benefit from the overall REU experience;
  • The PI’s prior experience, if any, supervising REU students, including papers published and student placements;
  • The relationship of the REU supplemental proposal to the original award;
  • Information about how students, including from underrepresented groups, will be recruited; and
  • A statement acknowledging that all students to be funded will be US citizens or permanent residents of the US.

Since supplemental funds requests are handled by the cognizant program officer overseeing the active award requesting the supplement, grantees should contact the cognizant program officers of their awards if they have questions or need additional information.

 

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UNC Creativity Hubs Pilot Awards

As part of UNC’s Strategic Framework, the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research (OVCR) is taking a new approach to the development of fluid, cross-disciplinary research by establishing the Creativity Hubs. Creativity Hubs are collaborative networks that think through emerging problems and come up with innovative solutions. These hubs will nurture research innovation and risk-taking endeavors to build a culture promoting discovery and curiosity, while recognizing and rewarding exceptional performance. The goal is to incentivize researchers to generate new ideas that address important, emerging challenges, to establish a defined work plan to give rise to new discoveries and new ways of thinking that push boundaries and borders of disciplines, and to generate impact and attract large-scale extramural funding.

The intent of the Creativity Hub award is to promote the development of innovative ideas that emerge from cross-disciplinary interactions to address key challenges and/or develop new knowledge. The supported projects are for new work that has not been previously funded and is expected to lead to large-scale extramural funding from public or private entities, such as government agencies, corporations, private foundations, or venture capital. Proposers should articulate the problem/challenge, how the proposed research will provide solutions to the challenge, how the diverse expertise of the team forms a greater whole that promotes new ways of thinking, and how the proposed research program would make the team highly competitive in pursuing future extramural funding or commercialization opportunities.

Over the past year, in consultation with research deans and pan-campus center and institute directors, the OVCR has identified six strategic research priorities reflecting UNC’s strengths where convergence in social sciences, humanistic scholarship, foundational research, health science, and the natural sciences will accelerate new discoveries and solutions to emerging challenges:

  • The Brain
  • Cancer
  • Data Science
  • The Environment
  • Opportunity, Well-Being, & Culture
  • Precision Health & Society

While the OVCR is encouraging on-campus teams to design projects touching on one or more of these foci, projects proposing revolutionary ideas through convergent research in any discipline are welcome.

Creativity Hubs

Pre-Proposals are due November 13th , 2017

 

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Discovery Research PreK – 12 (DRK12)

The Discovery Research PreK-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer science (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of STEM education innovations and approaches. Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects. Projects should result in research-informed and field-tested outcomes and products that inform teaching and learning. Teachers and students who participate in DRK-12 studies are expected to enhance their understanding and use of STEM content, practices and skills.

The DRK-12 program invites proposals that address immediate challenges that are facing preK-12 STEM education as well as those that anticipate radically different structures and functions of preK-12 teaching and learning. The DRK-12 program has three major research and development strands: (1) Assessment; (2) Learning; and (3) Teaching. The program recognizes the synergy among the three strands and that there is some overlap and interdependence among them. However, proposals should identify a clear focus of the proposed research efforts (i.e., assessment, learning, or teaching) consistent with the proposal’s main objectives and research questions. The program supports six types of projects: (1) Exploratory, (2) Design and Development, (3) Impact, (4) Implementation and Improvement, (5) Syntheses, and (6) Conferences. All six types of projects apply to each of the three DRK-12 program strands.

17 – 584

Proposals due to OSR November 7th, 2017

 

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NSF Advancing Informal STEM Learning

The Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) program seeks to advance new approaches to and evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments; and engage the public of all ages in learning STEM in informal environments.

The AISL program supports six types of projects: (1) Pilots and Feasibility Studies, (2) Research in Service to Practice, (3) Innovations in Development, (4) Broad Implementation, (5) Literature Reviews, Syntheses, or Meta-Analyses, and (6) Conferences.

NSF 17-573

 

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2017 NSF CISE (Small, Medium and Large)

The Department of Computer Science Quick-Guide to the 2017 NSF CISE Core Programs includes summary information on IIS, CNS, CCF and SaTC. The spreadsheet also contains links to each solicitation and OSR deadlines.

2017 NSF Solicitation Quick-Guide

Small proposals due to OSR November 8th, 2017

Medium and Large proposals due to OSR  Mid September / and early October, 2017

 

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NSF Major Research Instrumentation (MRI)

The Major Research Instrumentation Program (MRI) serves to increase access to shared scientific and engineering instruments for research and research training in our Nation’s institutions of higher education, and not-for-profit museums, science centers and scientific/engineering research organizations. This program especially seeks to improve the quality and expand the scope of research and research training in science and engineering, by providing organizations with opportunities to acquire instrumentation that supports the research and research training goals of the organization.  The program emphasizes shared-use instrumentation that will enhance the capabilities of researchers both within and outside the proposing organization. Development efforts that leverage the strengths of private sector partners to build instrument development capacity at MRI submission-eligible organizations are encouraged.

Due by 5:00 pm Tuesday, October 17, 2017:

Submit the following information to Denise Lindley at Limited_Submissions@unc.edu in ONE file (Word or PDF):

A)        A pre-proposal with a project title and 5-6 pages containing the following information:

1)         the proposal category:  instrument acquisition or instrument development;

2)         indication of whether the proposal would involve the participation of other institutions;

3)         the names of the principal investigator(s) and outside collaborators, if any;

4)         a description of the proposed instrumentation;

5)         the research and research training to be conducted with the instrumentation;

6)         the reasons why new or further developed instrumentation is needed for this research activity, including a list of related instrumentation available at UNC-CH or nearby;

7)         the impact on research and educational activity that would result if the proposal were funded;

8)         a brief description of the management plan;

9)         a brief overview of the proposed budget including approximate total cost;

10)       a general strategy for meeting the 30% cost sharing requirement.

If the internal pre-proposal is a resubmission of a proposal previously submitted to the MRI program, reviews from the NSF and a response to the reviews of up to one page.

B)        NSF Biosketch

C)        Names of three internal (to UNC) faculty who could speak knowledgeably about the project, in the event of an internal review. Please exclude colleagues named on the project, chairs, deans, center directors, or others with whom you have a reporting relationship.

MRI

Office of Research Development Internal Deadline October 17th, 2017

 

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NSF CISE Research Infrastructure (CRI)

The CISE Research Infrastructure (CRI) program drives discovery and learning in the core CISE disciplines of the three participating CISE divisions by supporting the creation and enhancement of world-class research infrastructure that will support focused research agendas in computer and information science and engineering. This infrastructure will enable CISE researchers to advance the frontiers of CISE research. Further, through the CRI program, CISE seeks to ensure that individuals from a diverse range of academic institutions, including minority-serving and predominantly undergraduate institutions, have access to such infrastructure.

NSF 17-581

Preliminary proposals due to OSR October 26th, 2017

 

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NSF Computational and Data-Enabled Science and Engineering (CDS&E)

The goal of the CDS&E program is to identify and capitalize on opportunities for major scientific and engineering breakthroughs through new computational and data analysis approaches.  The intellectual drivers may be in an individual discipline or they may cut across more than one discipline in various Directorates.  The key identifying factor is that the outcome relies on the development, adaptation, and utilization of one or more of the capabilities offered by advancement of both research and infrastructure in computation and data, either through cross-cutting or disciplinary programs.

The CDS&E program welcomes proposals in any area of research supported through the participating divisions that address at least one of the following criteria:

·         Promote the creation, development, and application of the next generation of mathematical, computational and statistical theories and tools that are essential for addressing the challenges presented to the scientific and engineering communities by the ever-expanding role of computational modeling and simulation and the explosion and production of digital experimental and observational data.

·         Promote and encourage integrated research projects that create, develop and apply novel computational, mathematical and statistical methods, algorithms, software, data curation, analysis, visualization and mining tools to address major, heretofore intractable questions in core science and engineering disciplines, including large-scale simulations and analysis of large and heterogeneous collections of data.

·         Encourage adventurous ideas that generate new paradigms and that create and apply novel techniques, generating and utilizing digital data in innovative ways to complement or dramatically enhance traditional computational, experimental, observational, and theoretical tools for scientific discovery and application.

·         Encourage ideas at the interface between scientific frameworks, computing capability, measurements and physical systems that enable advances well beyond the expected natural progression of individual activities, including development of science-driven algorithms to address pivotal problems in science and engineering and efficient methods to access, mine, and utilize large data sets.

The CDS&E program is not intended to replace existing programs that make awards that involve computation and the analysis of large data sets. Rather, the CDS&E program is meant to fund awards that have a significant component of cyber development or cyber science that goes well beyond what would normally be included in these programs. PIs should ask for consideration and review as a CDS&E proposal only if the proposal addresses at least one of these additional cyber components. Any proposal submitted to the CDS&E program that does not satisfy at least one of the additional criteria listed above will be reviewed within the context of the individual program. A proposal that is requesting consideration within the context of CDS&E should begin the title with the identifying acronym “CDS&E:”

CDS&E 

Proposals due to OSR October 24th, 2017

 

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NSF Division of Electrical, Communications and Cyber Systems (ECCS) Programs

The three current ECCS programs include –

Communications, Circuits and Sensing-Systems (CCSS)

Energy, Power, Control and Networks (ECPN)

Electronics, Photonics and Magnetic Devices (EPMD)

The Division of Electrical, Communications and Cyber Systems (ECCS) addresses fundamental research issues underlying device and component technologies, power, controls, computation, networking, communications and cyber technologies. ECCS supports the integration and networking of intelligent systems principles at the nano, micro and macro scales for a variety of application domains in healthcare, homeland security, disaster mitigation, energy, telecommunications, environment, transportation, manufacturing, and other systems-related areas.

ECCS Programs

Proposals due to OSR October 25th, 2017

 

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DoD Medical Simulation and Information Sciences, Toward A Next-Generation Trauma Care Capability: Foundational Research for Autonomous, Unmanned, and Robotics Development of Medical Technologies (FORwARD) Award

The MSISRP FORwARD Award mechanism is being offered for the first time in FY17. This mechanism supports basic research to increase knowledge/understanding through discovery and hypothesis generation, and should focus on providing basic fundamental knowledge that will inform and enable the future development of novel autonomous and/or robotic medical systems to care for wounded soldiers/patients through breakthrough, exploratory research. The objective of the FY17 MSISRP FORwARD Award is focused on addressing the following Topic Areas: 1. Autonomous and Unmanned Medical Capability – Identify novel ideas, approaches and research towards the conceptualization of autonomous and unmanned technologies for next-generation, high-quality medical capabilities with limited or absent medical care personnel, or personnel with limited skills. Research novel concepts, plausible approaches and advanced concept designs using biologically inspired cognitive computing models, machine learning, artificial intelligence, soft robotic semi-autonomous/autonomous resuscitation concepts and advanced applications of information sciences among other innovative, exploratory research towards advancing the state-of-the-art in delivery of forward resuscitative care at the point of injury. 2. Medical Robotics Research – Identify novel ideas, approaches and research towards the conceptualization of medical robotics and real-time tele-presence capabilities exploring the limits of machine perception for tele-robotic semi-autonomous and autonomous trauma care within remote and dispersed geographic settings. This could include exploratory research in semi-autonomous robotic surgery to improve the safety profile and efficacy of tele-surgical procedures and outcomes using hard robotics in challenging situations (e.g., combat casualties on the multi-domain battlefield or mass casualty situations) and remote or austere geographic locations, among other innovative, exploratory research aims and novel concepts.

DOD FORwARD

Pre-Application Submissions due to OSR November 13th, 2017

 

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NSF Small Business Technology Transfer Program Phase I (STTR)

The STTR program is intended to support scientific excellence and technological innovation through the investment of federal research funds to build a strong national economy by stimulating technological innovation in the private sector; strengthening the role of small business in meeting federal research and development needs; increasing the commercial application of federally supported research results; and fostering and encouraging participation by socially and economically disadvantaged and women-owned small businesses. Because the program has no topical or procurement focus, the NSF offers very broad solicitation topics that are intended to permit as many eligible science- and technology-based small businesses as possible to compete for funding.

NSF 17-595

Proposals due to OSR November 27th, 2017

 

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NSF Small Business Innovation Research Program Phase I (SBIR)

The SBIR program is intended to support scientific excellence and technological innovation through the investment of federal research funds to build a strong national economy by stimulating technological innovation in the private sector; strengthening the role of small business in meeting federal research and development needs; increasing the commercial application of federally supported research results; and fostering and encouraging participation by socially and economically disadvantaged and women-owned small businesses. Because the program has no topical or procurement focus, the NSF offers very broad solicitation topics that are intended to permit as many eligible science- and technology-based small businesses as possible to compete for funding.

NSF 17-596

Proposals due to OSR November 27th, 2017

 

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NIH Standard Programs

NIH standard programs have three application deadlines per year. These NIH deadlines are indicated at the link below (note that closing date for OSR is one week prior). Additional Request for Applications (RFA) have separate deadlines, and appear on this page when available.

NIH standard program deadlines

 

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NSF Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation (CMMI) Programs

CMMI programs generally have due dates in January and September, although some programs accept proposals at any time. Many of these programs have a strong complementary computational component. All programs are listed at the link below.

CMMI Programs

 

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NSF Cyberlearning for Work at the Human-Technology Frontier

The purpose of the Cyberlearning for Work at the Human-Technology Frontier program is to fund exploratory and synergistic research in learning technologies to prepare learners to excel in work at the human-technology frontier. This program responds to the pressing societal need to educate and re-educate learners of all ages (students, teachers and workers) in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) content areas to ultimately function in highly technological environments, including in collaboration with intelligent systems. Innovative technologies can reshape learning processes, which in turn can influence new technology design. Learning technology research in this program should be informed by the convergence of multiple disciplines: education and learning sciences, computer and information science and engineering, and cognitive, behavioral and social sciences. This program funds learning technology research in STEM and other foundational areas that enable STEM learning.

NSF 17-598

Proposals due to OSR January 2nd, 2018

 

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NSF CISE Scalable Parallelism in the Extreme (SPX)

The SPX program aims to support transformative projects to re-evaluate and possibly re-design the traditional computer hardware and software stack for today’s heterogeneous, parallel, concurrent, and distributed systems. Thus, SPX seeks collaborations combining, for example, a deep understanding in parallel programming with expertise in software tools; experience in heterogeneous parallel architectures with algorithm design expertise; experience and discovery in emerging substrate technologies with architecture and systems design; knowledge in an application domain with expertise in energy-efficient memory hierarchies; hardware design know-how with human factors expertise; experience in runtime platforms and virtualization tools with knowledge in reliable and distributed computing; and experience in parallel data management with knowledge of parallel linear algebra or statistical algorithms. The program also seeks collaborations that integrate the many different techniques for the analysis and modeling of resources (such as time, memory, and energy) in various areas such as theory, uncertainty quantification, software systems, distributed systems, and programming languages, to create more predictable performance and scalable implementations of software systems, and more efficient ways of distributing workloads over available computing resources. To increase symbiosis between theory and practice, SPX supports research that aims to extract general principles that can be validated on a variety of application domains. In some cases, research may also generate technologies with the potential to be incorporated into innovative applications, tools, products, and cyberinfrastructures that support research in other scientific domains.

NSF 17-600

Proposals due to OSR January 2nd, 2018