Maimone Honored with 2014 Timothy L. Quigg Award

May 2, 2014
2014 Timothy L. Quigg Award
Tim Quigg presenting the 2014 Timothy L. Quigg Student Inventor of the Year Award to Andrew Maimone

Graduate student Andrew Maimone was recognized with the Timothy L. Quigg Student Inventor of the Year Award for 2013-2014.

The award, created in 2013 in honor of then-Associate Chairman for Administration, Finance, and Entrepreneurship Timothy L. Quigg, is given yearly to the student judged as showing the highest entrepreneurial spirit in the department, by inventorship or starting a new enterprise. Recipients receive a cash prize of $500 and have their names engraved on a permanent plaque in Sitterson Hall.

During the 2013-2014 academic year, Maimone has had papers accepted by the 2013 International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR), the 2014 International Symposium of the Society for Information Display (SID), and the 2014 Conference and Exhibition on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques (SIGGRAPH).

Maimone, one of only five nationwide recipients of a 2014 NVIDIA Fellowship, also served on the IEEE Virtual Virtual Reality Conference 2014 Program Committee.

At the 2014 ACM SIGGRAPH Conference in August, Maimone will present a technical Paper; a paper to be published in ACM Transactions on Graphics, foremost peer-reviewed journal in the area of computer graphics; an emerging technologies demo; and a talk about his research.

Timothy L. Quigg, the award’s namesake, served 22 years in the UNC Department of Computer Science before retiring at the end of May 2013.

Taylor Recognized with Inventor of the Year Award

May 1, 2014

taylor inventor of the yearDr. Russell M. Taylor II, a research professor in the Department of Computer Science, was recognized on Thursday by the UNC Office of Technology Development (OTD) with its 2014 Inventor of the Year Award.

Taylor, a joint professor in the Department of Computer Science, the Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Curriculum on Applied Sciences and Engineering, was recognized for his contribution to innovation at UNC. Taylor was honored at the Celebration of Inventorship, an annual event hosted by the Office of Technology Development to celebrate UNC innovators who have had patents issued during the previous calendar year.

Following the presentation of the Inventor of the Year Award, Taylor shared an overview of his work and his experience in commercialization of technology, including wisdom gained through his involvement in several technology start-ups, including 3rd Tech and Rheomics.

Taylor’s research interests include scientific visualization, haptic display, virtual words, and interactive 3D computer graphics. He serves as co-director of the Computer-Integrated Systems for Microscopy and Manipulation NIH Resource (CISMM) and visualization lead on the Models and Data Analysis Initiative (MADAI).

Reiter named IEEE Fellow

April 15, 2014
reiter news
Michael K. Reiter

IEEE (the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), the world’s largest professional association dedicated to advancing technological innovation and excellence for the benefit of humanity, recently honored Professor Michael K. Reiter from the Department of Computer Science at UNC-Chapel Hill in their IEEE Fellow Class of 2014.

IEEE Fellow is a distinction reserved for select IEEE members whose extraordinary accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest are deemed fitting of this prestigious grade elevation. IEEE Fellow is the highest grade of membership and is recognized by the technical community as a prestigious honor and an important career achievement.

Reiter was recognized for his contributions to computer security and fault-tolerant distributed computing.

Undergraduate research featured on UNC TV

March 14, 2014

Undergraduate student Hannah Kerner was featured in a UNC TV story for her research with physical robots. The entire UNC TV video can be viewed here (Hannah’s segment begins at 3:03).

UNC CS Partners with Pebble Education Project

December 19, 2013
pebble
Pebble smartwatch

Pebble Technology announced a partnership with the Department of Computer Science at UNC as part of the Pebble Education Project, an educational donation program designed to foster creativity and innovation in the computer science and engineering communities.

The project will see the company donate Pebble smartwatches to the Department of Computer Science to be used as educational tools for computer science coursework and projects. As a partner institution, the Department will have the flexibility to utilize donated watches as it sees fit, which could include loaning watches to other departments within the university. Pebble—a team with a large number of computer science and engineering graduates—envisions the program as a key opportunity to give back to organizations that foster innovation, entrepreneurship, and creativity in education.

“This program was born out of a desire to assist educators in engaging students more deeply in coursework related to systems and embedded programming, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Pebble’s open SDK really makes the sky the limit,” says Kean Wong, VP of Software Engineering at Pebble. “What we love about Pebble’s Education Project is its flexibility. Educators are free to tailor their donated Pebbles and our developer tools to best align with students’ educational goals.”

Pebble and the Department of Computer Science hope that students will benefit from a learning environment with real-world applications. Facilitated access to watches and tools for developing app software will contribute to a hands-on learning and teaching experience. Students and faculty developing apps for the Pebble will also add to the rapidly growing app marketplace.

According to Kevin Jeffay, Gillian T. Cell Distinguished Professor of computer science, the Pebble watches will arrive during the Spring 2014 academic semester.

By participating in the first round of the Pebble Education Project, the Department joins computer science and engineering programs at Carnegie Mellon University, Curiosity Hacked, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Virginia, and Virginia Tech.

The Pebble smartwatch is the result of a record-breaking crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter.com. Designed to work wirelessly with a smartphone via Bluetooth connection, Pebble is one of the leading smartwatches currently on the market. The watchmaker has kept its Open SDK (software development kit) freely available to programmers since its release.

Graduate student, faculty members receive Marr Prize

December 12, 2013
marr prize
Clockwise from top: Vicente Ordonez, Alex Berg, Tamara Berg

Graduate student Vicente Ordonez and assistant professors Alex Berg and Tamara Berg were awarded the 2013 Marr Prize at the Fourteenth International Conference on Computer Vision in Sydney, Australia.

Their award-winning paper, “From Large-Scale Image Categorization to Entry-Level Categories,” was also co-authored by Jia Deng of Stanford University and Yejin Choi of Stony Brook University. It is the 20th paper to be awarded the Marr Prize since 1987.

The Marr Prize, given biennially, is one of the most prestigious honors in computer vision research. It is named for British neuroscientist and psychologist David Courtnay Marr.

For more information, visit http://www.pamitc.org/iccv13/awards.php.

Baruah named IEEE Fellow

November 27, 2012
baruah
Professor Sanjoy Baruah

IEEE (the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), the world’s largest professional association dedicated to advancing technological innovation and excellence for the benefit of humanity, recently honored Professor Sanjoy Baruah from the Department of Computer Science at UNC-Chapel Hill in their IEEE Fellow Class of 2013.

IEEE Fellow is a distinction reserved for select IEEE members whose extraordinary accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest are deemed fitting of this prestigious grade elevation. IEEE Fellow is the highest grade of membership and is recognized by the technical community as a prestigious honor and an important career achievement.

Dr. Baruah was recognized for his contributions to the design of real-time embedded systems.

Alumnus to receive ACM SIGGRAPH Computer Graphics Achievement Award

July 3, 2012

gregturk_smallUNC computer science alumnus Greg Turk (Ph.D. 1992) will receive the 2012 Computer Graphics Achievement Award from ACM SIGGRAPH at its annual conference in August. The award recognizes Turk for his contributions to physically-inspired mathematical application in graphics, particularly his work on texture synthesis, geometric modeling, and physical simulation involving thin structures.

Much of Turk’s work on textures stems from his dissertation research, in which he showed how using a cascade of reaction-diffusion systems could generate realistic-looking patterns, like leopard spots or zebra stripes.

Turk is also well known for the “Stanford bunny,” one of the most popular test models in computer graphics, which has been used in hundreds of SIGGRAPH papers. He created the bunny using a technique called “zippered meshes,” developed with Marc Levoy (Ph.D. 1989), to create polygonal models from several range scans.

His current research is in the area of simulation of biological systems, including evolution, animal locomotion, and plant growth.

stanfordbunnyphoto_smTurk is currently a professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he is a member of the School of Interactive Computing and the Graphics, Visualization and Usability Center. His Ph.D. advisor was Henry Fuchs, the Federico Gil Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at UNC.

Turk will receive his award during the SIGGRAPH keynote session at 11 a.m., Monday, August 6, in Los Angeles, Calif. He and other awardees will give their individual talks at 2 p.m. that day.

Diane Pozefsky named to WITI Hall of Fame

October 4, 2011

diane WITIResearch Professor and alumna Diane Pozefsky has been named to the Women in Technology International (WITI) Hall of Fame for 2011.

Diane earned her Ph.D. from UNC in 1979 and then worked at IBM for 25 years. While at IBM, Diane worked on the design of networking architectures and their product implementations. Her 25 patents earned her the title of IBM Master Inventor in 1996.  When she was named an IBM Fellow in 1994, there had only been one other woman previously given the honor. Her contributions were also recognized by her peers as they elected her to the IBM Academy of Technology and to two terms on the Academy’s governing council.

When she retired from IBM in 2004, Diane returned to UNC as a faculty member.

“Since coming back to UNC, Diane has been most committed to undergraduate education and to teaching the computer science courses for non-computer science majors – indeed, for students scared of technology,” said Dr. Fred Brooks, Kenan Professor of Computer Science and department founder. “Equally valuable has been her teaching our graduate and undergraduate COMP 523: Software Engineering Laboratory, to which she brings experience no one else on our faculty can touch. I created this course based on my own industry experience. I taught it 22 times; she does it better.”

Diane’s work with undergraduates has not gone unnoticed. She has won the undergraduate teaching award, voted on by the department’s graduating seniors, three times, most recently in May 2011. She was also instrumental in establishing an internship component to the computer science education and in getting the combined B.S.-M.S. program up and running.

Diane is one of five inductees into the WITI Hall of Fame for 2011. The WITI Hall of Fame was established in 1996 by WITI to recognize, honor, and promote the outstanding contributions women make to the scientific and technological communities that improve and evolve our society. WITI is the leading trade organization for women in technology.

 

Web site: http://www.witi.com

More than 2 million books read on Tar Heel Reader

February 11, 2011

On February 11, 2011, 1,000 days after its launch, the online reading resource Tar Heel Reader has exceeded more than 2 million books read on the site.

Created by UNC Professors Karen Erickson, director of the UNC Center for Literacy and Disability Studies and Gary Bishop in Computer Science, the site allows teachers, parents and volunteers to easily create books on topics of interest to readers of all ages. Prior to the creation of Tar Heel Reader, most early reader material was geared toward preschoolers.

Readers with impaired movement can read books using only one or two switches. Readers may also have the book read aloud using text to speech.

Nearly 15,000 books in 15 languages are available on the site. The readers come from 150 different countries and all 50 states. In many countries the site is being used to teach English as a second language.